Monthly Archives: November 2017

A wee Ardmore collectable

Halò Single Malt Mates,

Ardmore distillery is a single malt Scotch whisky distillery. The distillery is owned and operated by Beam Suntory, an American subsidiary of Suntory Holdings of Osaka, Japan. The distillery was built in 1898 by William Teacher’s son, Adam,[2] to secure fillings for their blend, Teacher’s Highland Cream (of which it remains the principal component). It is located in the farmland of “the Garioch”, near the River Bogie and the village Kennethmont, Huntly, Aberdeenshire. Two stills were added in 1955, and four more in 1974, for a total of eight.[2][3] The distillery had its own maltings until the mid-1970s, and its own cooperage until the late 1980s. Until early 2001 it used coal to fire the stills.

If peat is used then the whisky has a peaty. Here is the whisky:

Ardmore

15 Year Old Edinburgh Whisky Library Collection 46% 70cl

Details
Producer Edinburgh Whisky Ltd.
Age 15 Year Old
Bottle Size 70cl
Alc. Volume 46%
Bottler Independent
Region Highland
Vintage 2002
Country Scotland

Description
The Edinburgh Whisky Library collection has highlighted some very interesting whiskies since they’ve been launched and this Ardmore is another cracking addition to the range. First distilled in 2002 it has matured for 15 years before being selected to join this exclusive club of malts.

Official Tasting Notes
Nose: Initially, like a doctor’s surgery in the ‘70’s – iodine, bandages, carbolic – then more complex, menthol and aromatic. The medicinal morphs into meaty, like a bad Tarrantino movie, old butcher’s block and heavily smoked ham. Salty. Intriguing smokiness intensifies – peat fire embers and newly snuffed out candles (with warm wax). Fresh walnuts.

Palate: Smooth, oily texture. More warming peat than medicinal now. Rich, savoury/sweet, juicy-fruit. Lush bourbon vanilla wraps around the smoke. Light spice. Hint of rubber. Caraway seed. Smoked German sausages anyone?

Finish: Great interplay of the smoky, savoury and the buttery. Rich, thick and aromatic. Long heather honey finish.

Thoughts on whiskey: ‎”I wish to live to 150 years old, but the day I die, I wish it to be with a cigarette in one hand and a glass of whiskey in the other.” Ava Gardner

Here’s tae the heath, the hill and the heather,
The bonnet, the plaid, the kilt and the feather.

A h-uile la sona dhuibh‘s gun la idir dona dhuibh!
May all your days be happy ones.

Slainte Mhor Agad

Your Scotch Spirit Master

Whisky Alert Whisky Alert

Halò Single Malt Mates,

I loes An Cnoc. I hae a 22 year old now as Mo Clann gave it to me for Nollaig (Christmas). Everybody likes it when they have a wee dram.

Here is a new expression that looks like it is even better. Here is the whisky:

AnCnoc

24 Year Old 46% 70cl

Details
Producer Inverhouse
Age 24 Year Old
Bottle Size 70cl
Alc. Volume 46%
Bottler Official
Region Highland

Description
This 24 year old joins the aged ranks of An Cnoc’s range as a wonderfully sherried bottling. After 21 years maturation on American oak ex-sherry casks, the whisky is finished off for 3 years in first fill Spanish oak Oloroso casks, giving layers of sherry notes building on top of the classic light An Cnoc style.

Official Tasting Notes
Nose: Densely sweet and spicy with a cosy embrace of Christmas cake. Rich yet crisp with notes of vanilla, set toffee and lemon juice.
Palate: Spiciness continues with hints of candied orange slices, warm honey and worn leather filling the mouth with a symphony of maturity.

Sherried bottlings make me jump for joy! So I am jumping! I strongly recommend this whisky as it looks great!

Thoughts on whiskey: “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” Mark Twain

Here’s tae the heath, the hill and the heather,
The bonnet, the plaid, the kilt and the feather.

A h-uile la sona dhuibh‘s gun la idir dona dhuibh!
May all your days be happy ones.

Slàinte mhòr agus a h-uile beannachd duibh.
Great health and every good blessing to you

Your Scotch Spirit Master

A wee collectable from Ben Nevis

Halò Single Malt Mates,

Apparently the Ben Nevis Distillery sends most of its spirit overseas or as a component in blends. According to RMW the single malt is not seen to often in Scotland. Well, I see a Ben Nevis 17, and I have it.

It is a very guid dram. We paired it with flan, a mexican custard.The experts say creme brulee, But since I had none, flan it was.

If you find a Ben Nevis, buy it because it seems to become a collectable after a number of years..

Here is the current collectable whisky:

Scotch
>
Old & Rare
>
Ben Nevis

Ben Nevis
1992 10 Year Old Cask Strength 55.2% 70cl

£175.00
(Inc. VAT)

Details
Producer Ben Nevis Distillery
Age 10 Year Old
Bottle Size 70cl
Alc. Volume 55.2%
Bottler Official
Region Highland
Country Scotland

Description
This single cask Ben Nevis was distilled in 1992 and matured in ex-sherry wood for 10 years at the distillery. It’s been bottled at natural cask strength and is a very interesting look at a distillery not seen too often in Scotland.

This distillery is in the Highlands between Elgin and Glasgow. If you happen to be in Alba, pop in! You will like it..

Thoughts on whiskey: “Happiness is having a rare steak, a bottle of whisky, and a dog to eat the rare steak.” Johnny Carson

Lift ’em high and drain ’em dry
To the guy who says, “My turn to buy.”

A h-uile la sona dhuibh‘s gun la idir dona dhuibh!
May all your days be happy ones.

Slainte Mhor Agad

Your Scotch Spirit Master

A wee new peated Glen Scotia

Halò Single Malt Mates,

Here is a new peated Glen Scotia. Single cask and aged 10 years. Very interesting. You peat lovers should like this!

Here is the whisky:

Glen Scotia

2007 Single Cask Royal Mile Whiskies Exclusive 59.2% 70cl

Details
Producer Loch Lomond Distillers
Age 10 Year Old
Bottle Size 70cl
Alc. Volume 59.2%
Bottler Official
Region Campbeltown
Vintage 2007
Country Scotland

Description
The Campbeltown resurgence continues! We’ve managed to get our hands on this exclusive single cask of peated Glen Scotia and we couldn’t be happier with all 204 bottles of it. It’s smattered with pepper, fruit and, of course, a gentle smokiness, which all come together to form a delicious cask strength dram to be savoured. Act fast as we don’t think this one will be around for long!

Staff Tasting Notes Nose: A punchy nose, with great combination of iodine, smoke and swimming pools. Vanilla, but not over the top. Sweet baked goods and shortcrust pastry.
Palate: Short, powerful with a buttery pastry core overlain with oyster shells, swimming pools and iodine.
Overall: Caol Ila like at times, but a little grubbier and wilder.

Official Tasting Notes
Opens on a gentle smokiness, then some peppery notes, fresh cut barley, orange blossom, fresh natural vanilla alongside a delicious syrupy sweetness.

Glen Scotia has always had a wee bit of peat in its whisky. This one is similar to Caol Ila only it is cask strength which means it bites. A very interesting dram indeed.

Here’s tae the heath, the hill and the heather,
The bonnet, the plaid, the kilt and the feather.

A h-uile la sona dhuibh‘s gun la idir dona dhuibh!
May all your days be happy ones

Lift ’em high and drain ’em dry
To the guy who says, “My turn to buy.”

Slainte Mhath,

Your Scotch Spirit Master

A wee whisky fact

Halò Single Malt Mates,

James Eadie is an Indy bottler that has been around since 1854. Since I am a Yank the Company just got on my radar through my vendor sources.. Indy bottlers always come up with guid collectables…

Here us a blurb on the company:

James Eadie

DISTINCTION

James Eadie sources and distributes finest Scotch whisky. Established in 1854, we specialise in limited edition blended and single malt whiskies. James Eadie whiskies include malts from Speyside, Highland and Islay.

Rigorous stock selection is critical. We access the best stocks of malt and grain in Scotland, valuing wood type and maturation age. Our experts sample dozens of casks in their search for quality.

OUR WHISKIES

Our Caol Ila 8 Small Batch (casks 315438, 315441-315442) was voted the most popular Islay whisky of the 2017 Edinburgh Whisky Fringe.

James Eadie’s Trade Mark “X” is now available from Royal Mile Whiskies and Master of Malt.

Here is a new whisky:

Inchgower

8 Year old James Eadie Single Cask 46% 70cl

Details
Producer James Eadie
Age 8 Year Old
Bottle Size 70cl
Alc. Volume 46%
Bottler Independent
Region Speyside
Country Scotland

Description
Have you tried a single malt from Inchgower? So many single malt lovers haven’t and it’s a real shame. Light, floral but also packed with fruit. James Eadie have even given you the chance to try it as a are single cask expression!

Staff Tasting Notes
Nose: Sweet and slightly jammy. Toffee sauce/fudge with a bit of celery, clementines and watermelon.
Palate: Spicy oakiness leads into a smooth burn of buttery charcoal.
Comments: Not too bad with enough going on to make it a very interesting dram!

This is a young expression, only eight years old, but it is from a single cask Which makes it a collectable and each bottle is the same in nose palate and finish. My son Matt loes young stuff so he won’t turn this one down if offered and neither should we.

Thoughts on whiskey: “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.

Here’s tae the heath, the hill and the heather,
The bonnet, the plaid, the kilt and the feather.

A h-uile la sona dhuibh‘s gun la idir dona dhuibh!
May all your days be happy ones

Slainte Mhor Agad

Your Scotch Spirit Master

A wee guid Pairing with a BenRiach 17.

Halò Single Malt Mates,

Tonight I decided to pair a guid Scottish Angus steak with A single Cask BenRiach 17 matured in Pedro Ximenez sherry casks. O Joy!

The nose is wonderfully fruity with notes of sherry. Paired with the steak the Palate and Finish were extended and tasted great..

Here is the whisky:

BenRiach 17 Year Old Pedro Ximénez Sherry Finish
(70cl, 46%)

BenRiach 17 Year Old Pedro Ximénez Sherry Finish (70cl, 46%)(2 Reviews)

BenRiach 17yo PX Wood Bottling Note

Initially matured in refill American oak barrels, This 17 year old from BenRiach spent a finishing period in Pedro Ximénez Sherry butts from Jerez de la Frontera.

Tasting Note by The Chaps at Master of Malt

Producer’s Tasting Note:
Nose: Creamy spices, chocolate and sugar-coated almonds flow over sweet sultanas and dark fruit cake.
Palate: Dark chocolate and freshly ground coffee beans merge with sweet dates and fresh figs. Delightful, peppery, vintage oak.
Finish: Warm cigar box spices add to the long, contrasting finish.

User Reviews of the BenRiach 17 Year Old Pedro Ximénez Sherry Finish
Neat is best

This is indeed a sherry bomb. I’d encourage to drink it neat and not add water if you want to enjoy the full character of this delightful whisky. Very well made. However I must add a comment that the moment I tried this I was immediately taken to some of the 50’s batches of Aberlour A’bunadh which is a cask strength whisky that with water is added brings fourth it’s true flavor characteristics and many aspects of this BenRiach 17 certainly reminded me of it considerably in that state. I am going to say that I feel Aberlour A’bunadh offers better value though as it’s less expensive yet has greater longevity for the price and of which it’s flavour offers equal if not better than this BenRiach depending on which Aberlour batch you try. This reminded me a lot of batch 51 with water added, though perhaps not as tannic. If you want a real treat though, find batch 53 of Aberlour A’bunadh and add a little water and you’ll be in true try sherry bomb bliss. That said the complexity and perfect balance in that batch is well beyond just the sherry aspects, there’s so much more complex beauty to it. So all in all my call is if you’ve tried this BenRiach and enjoyed it, and not Aberlour A’bunadh as of yet, then find any batch of Aberlour A’bunadh and make that the next step in your sherry bomb journey and let your palate be the judge. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

This is a guid dram and pairs well with steak as most whiskies do! I believe you should always add a wee bit of water to wake up a whisky!

Thoughts on whiskey: “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” Mark Twain

I would like to make a toast to lying, stealing, cheating and drinking. If you’re going to lie, lie for a friend. If you’re going to steal, steal a heart. If your going to cheat, cheat death. And if you’re going to drink, drink with me.

Slàinte mhòr agus a h-uile beannachd duibh.
Great health and every good blessing to you

Your Scotch Spirit Master

Och, an exotic maturation indeed!

Halò Single Malt Mates,

Och, I loes exotic maturations. I loes port, chardonay, and whatever maturations.
Mo Clann and I visited Benromach Distillery near Elgin. We were staying on the other side of a route and had to walk across the highway to reach the Distillery. It was a brill tour, actually

.

Here is the whisky and its exotic maturation.

Benromach
Sassicaia Finish 45% 70cl

Details
Producer Gordon and MacPhail
Bottle Size 70cl
Alc. Volume 45%
Bottler Official
Region Speyside
Country Scotland

Description
Sassicaia wine is the original ‘Super Tuscan’ packing a mighty flavoursome punch. Benromach have taken their traditional Speyside whisky and finished it in casks which used to hold this wine to add an extra layer of depth to the character.

Official Tasting Notes
Nose: The nose is brimming with luscious red berries and hints of ginger and cinnamon, complemented by a subtle sense of smoke.
With Water: Opening out it’s fresh as a breeze with subtle herbs and summer fruits.
Palate: The initial peppery palate gives way to a ripe fruit bowl of flavours strawberries, raspberries, orange zest and you can detect gorgeous milk chocolate drops, too.
With Water: Peppery with a sweet toffee note followed by a slight saltiness and a subtle smoky edge.

This expression sounds delish. I am thinking about getting some for meself. But alas not til next year.

“Whisky, drink divine!
Why should drivelers bore us
With the praise of wine
While we’ve thee before us?”
(Joseph O’Leary)

“Love makes the world go round? Not at all. Whiskey makes it go round twice as fast.”
Compton Mackenzie

Lift ’em high and drain ’em dry
To the guy who says, “My turn to buy.”

A h-uile la sona dhuibh‘s gun la idir dona dhuibh!
May all your days be happy ones.

Slainte mhath,

Your Scotch Spirit Master

A wee guid pairing.

Halò Single Malt Mates,

Tonite I decided to pair a Kilkerran which is a Campbeltown and used barley heated by peat which gives it a wee bit of a peaty nose and palate, with real spicy Italian meatballs. The meatball sauce included spicy Italian sausage. Some Islays have a lot more peaty nose and palate than this one.

Well, the palate blended nicely with the peaty bourbon matured whisky and it extended the finish of the meal and the whisky…The nose is peaty and citrusy with a wee bit of vanilla..This distribution had only a set number of bottles so it is a collectable…

Here is the whisky:

Kilkerran WIP 6th Bourbon Details

Country Scotch Whisky
Region Campbeltown Whisky
Distillery / Brand Glengyle
Bottler Glengyle
Style Single Malt Whisky
Alcohol 46.0%
Volume 70cl

Kilkerran WIP 6th Bourbon Bottling Note

For the 6th release of Kilkerran’s Work In Progress, we continue to be spoilt by the Glengyle distillery with two whiskies instead of one! As with the 5th release, one whisky was matured in Sherry casks and the other was matured in bourbon casks. This is the latter, the beautiful bourbon-cask matured expression.

Here is a blurb about Glengyle Distillery

Welcome to the virtual home of Campbeltown’s oldest new distillery, Mitchell’s Glengyle Distillery, home of Kilkerran single malt.

Our award winning single malt is produced in very limited quantities, making it as scarce as hens’ teeth. Despite its small production scale, Kilkerran is still available in small quantities in over 25 countries across the world.

William Mitchell founded the original Glengyle distillery in 1872, and subsequently sold it in 1919.

In 1925 the distillery was closed down. Over 75 years later, Mr Hedley Wright, the current chairman of J&A Mitchell & Co Ltd and the great-great nephew of William Mitchell, bought the old buildings, which had been lying empty for several years, and made the re-opening of Mitchell’s Glengyle Distillery in 2004 a reality.

Old closed distilleries are becoming new working distilleries. This should make the barley farmers happy and the livestock ranchers happier as there will be more draff available to feed the bonnie coos of Scotland.

Draff
the residue of husks after fermentation of the grain used in brewing, used as a food for cattle…

May you aye ha’e a copper to spare,
And a pinch o’ guide sneeshin’ to share!
And what is the best thing o’ a’ –
A freend at yet beck an’ yer ca’

Lift ’em high and drain ’em dry
To the guy who says, “My turn to buy.”

Slàinte mhòr agus a h-uile beannachd duibh.
Great health and every good blessing to you

Your Scotch Spirit Master

Whisky Alert Whisky Alert Guid tidings from Scotland!

Halò Single Malt Mates,

Here is some wee bit of braw news about distilleries long gone being reopened.O Joy!

What is a closed distillery?

Ever since the early days of whisky production, distilleries have appeared and disappeared. Some failed, some merged, some literally exploded, and the Scottish landscape is littered with the remains of historical distilling. However, October was a busy month for the lost distilleries of Scotland.

Port Ellen

Port Ellen in its heyday. Not much of it’s left these days…for now

It’s not every day that it’s announced that a closed distillery is to reopen, but two on the same day is unheard of. At the beginning of October, Diageo announced that it was going to reopen Brora and Port Ellen, both closed for more than 30 years. Not to be outdone, the very next day, Ian Macleod, owner of Glenoyne and Tamdhu, announced its news: Rosebank distillery, closed since 1993, was also going to reopen.
Why do distilleries close?

While we whisky lovers often take a more romantic view, whisky distilleries are, in the end, businesses. Unfortunately, this means that business decisions are made and distilleries close. Sometimes, as was more often the case in the more distant past, companies went bankrupt or couldn’t afford to keep distilleries open. However, more recently there have been more pragmatic decisions – when the whisky industry isn’t doing so well, companies who own multiple distilleries have closed some of them.

Remember, in order to be labeled Scotch Whisky, The Spirit must be distilled and aged 3 years and one day in a Royal bonded warehouse and tax is paid to the crown after distillation. This costs money. In other words every cost of making scotch is paid before a single bottle is sold.

Therefore if sales go below a certain level the distillery folds. Now DIAGEO Which owns many labels is reopening two. And Ian MacCleod Lor bless him is reopening Rosebank a Cambeltown.

And Aye when we were in Scotland we saw many closed distilleries.

Lord keep our pots distilling weel
Lord send the excise man to the de’il
Lord bless our couthy meal
Amen

Free translation
Lord keep our pot stills distilling well,
Lord send the revenuer to the devil
Lord bless our agreeable meal
Amen

Inspiring bold John Barleycorn!
What dangers thou canst make us scorn!
Wi’tippeny, we Fear nae evil;
Wi’usquabae, we’ll face the devil!

“Love makes the world go round? Not at all. Whiskey makes it go round twice as fast.”
Compton Mackenzie

Slainte gu Soirriadh

Your Scotch Spirit Master
An Actual Spirit Safe regulated by the Crown

A wee dissertation on the nose of a whisky

Halò Single Malt Mates,

The nose of the whisky is part of the triad of tasting. the nose, palate, and finish. My personal whisky guru Ralfy of Glasgow says to wait a minute for each year of guaranteed age in your glass before nosing.

So for a Glenfiddich 15, one of my faves, you wait 15 minutes before you nose the whisky. Personally, I have let a whisky wait in my glass for 20 to 45 minutes, because I was distracted. When I remembered the dram, the nose was so concentrated it was an amazing sensation.

The reason the nose is so important is that your nasal sensors are intrinsically part of your taste sensations. For example, when you have a cold and can’t smell much you lose a lot of taste on what you are eating. Or drinking.

It is my mission to share with you the techniques involved in having the finest taste and finish sensations of a great single malt. Not only because they are damn expensive, but they have a multitude of flavours that you can identify with only a single dram. It is not Scottish to fail to get your money’s worth of a dram. That is what makes Single Malt Scotch so much fun.

Thoughts on whiskey: “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.

Here’s tae the heath, the hill and the heather,
The bonnet, the plaid, the kilt and the feather.

A h-uile la sona dhuibh‘s gun la idir dona dhuibh!
May all your days be happy ones.

Slainte mhor agad

Your Scotch Spirit Master